Paths to Literacy

for students who are blind or visually impaired

Form 5: Initial Selection of Literacy Medium

Form 5: Initial Selection of Literacy Medium (Appendix G)

Allows for further involvement by the educational team through observations and data analysis to make a selection of reading media. Flow charts and decision tools are included to guide analysis.

This form is given to other members of the team in the classroom. By using it, they can determine whether a student's learning is primarily visual, tactile, or auditory. Based upon the result and a team discussion, the TVI can choose the appropriate teaching method between print and Braille.

A child who may be a print reader "uses vision efficiently to complete tasks at near distances", "shows interest in pictures and demonstrates the ability to identify pictures and or elements within pictures", and/or "identifies her name in print or understands that print has meaning".

A child more likely to use Braille "shows preference for exploring the environment tactually", "efficiently uses the tactual sense to identify small objects" and/or "identifies her name in Braille, and/or understands that Braille has meaning".

The examples above are general guidelines. The Learning Media Assessment contains more detailed flowcharts for decision-making. Regardless, this is a difficult process especially when working with a student who has multiple disabilities. Many times, particularly at the earlier age levels, TVI's use a combination of the various methods. Additional influences may be general trends in the "world of vision." For instance, the Braille Bill was generated when the world of vision was leaning towards auditory learning. As a result, people felt not enough students were learning Braille; therefore the Braille Bill was passed. This is where the TVI's have to stay neutral and not over-state their preference. TVI's must always look at the child as a unique individual with a particular learning style and consider what methods they will use. and have the student accomplish. Once that determination has been made, the key part is ongoing assessment. You can't stop assessing it once you've made the decision because changing eye conditions and changing classroom conditions affect the future literacy decisions.

The examples above are just some general guidelines. In the actual Learning Media Assessment, there are much better flowcharts for decision- making. Regardless, this is a difficult process especially when working with a student with multiple disabilities. Many times, particularly at the earlier age levels, TVI's work in combination of the various methods. Additional influences may be general trends in the "world of vision." For instance, the Braille Bill was generated when the world of vision was leaning towards auditory learning. As a result of that, people felt that not enough students were learning Braille, and therefore the Braille Bill was passed. This is where the TVI's have to stay neutral and not over-recommend one thing over another. TVI's must always look at that child as a unique individual with a learning style and consider what they are going to have to try and have the student accomplish. Once that determination has been made, the key part is ongoing assessment. You can't stop assessing it once you've made the decision because changing eye conditions and changing classroom conditions affect the future literacy decisions.
 

LMA form 5

Form 5 : Initial Selection of Literacy Medium (Appendix G: Blank Assessment Forms)

*Scaled-down sample versions of Appendix G (Blank Assessment Forms) can be viewed in this education module. To use these forms, please acquire by purchasing Learning Media Assessment: A Resource Guide for Teachers.
 



The materials in this section appeared on the e-advisor site, which was originally hosted by Boston Children's Hospital.  This material has now been moved to the website of Perkins School for the Blind.